Paris-Roubaix Past Winners and Records

By : Mr Mamil
Updated :

This site is supported by its audience. We may earn an affiliate commission when you purchase through links on this site.

2022 Paris-Roubaix Route Profile
2022 Paris-Roubaix Route Profile

Paris–Roubaix (The Hell of the North) is a one-day professional bicycle race in northern France, starting north of Paris and finishing in Roubaix, near the border with Belgium. Paris–Roubaix was first held in 1896 and has been held annually except for 1915 to 1918 (World War 1), 1940 to 1942 (World War 2), and 2020 (COVID-19).

It’s one of the oldest bicycle races in the world and is one of the five Monuments of the professional cycling calendar, along with the Milan-San Remo, Tour of Flanders, Liege-Bastogne-Liege, and Giro di Lombardia. It’s the second most popular bike race in France, after the Tour de France.

The Paris-Roubaix is considered the most difficult one-day race in professional cycling. The reason it’s nicknamed Hell of the North is because the cobblestone sectors (pavé) are notoriously rough and harsh on the bikes and riders.

The race is held in the north of France in early April, which is often cold and wet. This weather makes the cobbled roads even more difficult to ride on. It covers a distance of almost 257km (160mi), which makes it one of the longest one-day races on the professional cycling calendar.

Paris-Roubaix route

2022 Paris Roubaix Route Map
2022 Paris-Roubaix Route Profile

The distance of Paris-Roubaix in 2022 was 257.2km (159.8mi). Since its inception, the race distance ranged from 244km (151.6mi) to 280km (173.9mi) long.

The race starts in the town of Compiègne, located around 80km north of Paris. The riders then head northeast towards the town of Roubaix, located on the border with Belgium. The race finishes at the Roubaix Velodrome, a stadium for bicycle racing.

Before 1977, the race started in various locations around Paris.

  • 1896 to 1897 Porte Maillot, Paris
  • 1898 to 1899 – Chatou
  • 1900 – Saint-Germain
  • 1901 – Porte Maillot, Paris
  • 1902 to 1913 – Chatou
  • 1914 – Suresnes
  • 1919 to 1928 – Suresnes
  • 1929 to 1937 – Porte Maillot, Paris
  • 1938 – Argenteuil
  • 1939 – Porte Maillot, Paris
  • 1943 to 1965 – Saint-Denis
  • 1966 to 1976 – Chantilly
  • 1977 to present – Compiègne

Before 1989, the race finished in various locations around Roubaix.

  • 1896 to 1914 – Rue Vert, Croix
  • 1919 – Avenue de Jussieu
  • 1920 to 1921 -Stadium Jean Dubrulle,
  • 1922 to 1928 – Avenue des Villas
  • 1929 – Stade Amédée Prouvost
  • 1930 to 1934 – avenue des Villas
  • 1935 to 1936 – Flandres horse track
  • 1937 to 1939 – Avenue Gustave Delory
  • 1943 to 1985 – Roubaix Velodrome
  • 1986 to 1988 – Aavenue des Nations-Unies
  • 1989 to present – Roubaix Velodrome

Paris-Roubaix cobblestone sectors

Trouée d'Arenberg in Paris-Roubaix
Trouée d’Arenberg in Paris-Roubaix

In 2022, there are 30 cobbled sectors with a total distance of 54.8km (34mi). Each cobblestone sector is given a rating from 1-star (easiest) to 5-star (most difficult). The first cobblestone sector comes 96km (59.6mi) from the start.

There are three 5-star cobblestone sectors; Trouée d’Arenberg, Mons-en-Pevele, and Carrefour de I’Arbre.

  • Trouée d’Arenberg, also known as the Arenberg Forest, is the first real challenge in the race after 162km (101mi). This 2.4km (1.5mi) stretch of cobbles was first used in 1968 and has been used in every race edition since then. It’s considered to be the most crucial sector of cobbles and usually has a significant impact on the outcome of the race.
  • Mons-en-Pevele is a 3km (1.9mi) cobblestone sector located at 209km (130mi) was first used in 1903 and has been used in almost every race edition since then.
  • Carrefour de I’Arbre is located in the last 16km (10mi) of the race. It was first used in 1980 and has been used in every race edition since then. This 2.1km (1.2mi) sector of cobbles is considered to be one of the hardest in the race due to its location near the end when riders are already fatigued.
  • Quievy a Saint-Python and Hornaing to Wandignies, both 4-star sectors, are the longest at 3.7km (2.3mi) long.

The table below lists all the cobblestone sectors with their rating.

Sector #Sector nameDistance from start (km)Length (km)Rating
30Troisvilles to Inchy96.32.23
29Viesly to Quiévy102.81.83
28Quiévy to Saint-Python105.43.74
27Saint-Python110.11.52
26Haussy to Saint-Martin-sur-Écaillon116.60.82
25Saint-Martin-sur-Ecaillon to Vertain120.92.33
24Capelle to Ruesnes127.31.73
23Artres to Quérénaing136.31.32
22Quérénaing to Maing138.12.53
21Maing to Monchaux-sur-Ecaillon141.21.63
20Haveluy to Wallers154.22.54
19Trouée d’Arenberg162.42.35
18Wallers to Hélesmes168.41.63
17Hornaing to Wandignies175.23.74
16Warlaing to Brillon182.72.43
15Tilloy to Sars-et-Rosières186.22.44
14Beuvry-la-Forêt to Orchies192.51.43
13Orchies197.51.73
12Auchy-lez-Orchies to Bersée203.62.74
11Mons-en-Pévèle209.135
10Mérignies to Avelin215.10.72
9Pont-Thibault to Ennevelin218.51.43
8Templeuve – Moulin-de-Vertain224.40.52
7Cysoing to Bourghelles230.81.33
6Bourghelles to Wannehain233.31.13
5Camphin-en-Pévèle237.81.84
4Carrefour de l’Arbre240.52.15
3Gruson242.81.12
2Willems to Hem249.51.43
1Roubaix – Espace Charles Crupelandt256.30.31

Past Paris-Roubaix winners

Paris Roubaix 2022 Podium Winners
Paris-Roubaix 2022 Winner, Dylan Van Baarle (center)

The 2022 Paris-Roubaix winner is Dylan Van Baarle of Team Ineos-Grenadiers. Two riders have won Paris-Roubaix four times, and seven have won it three times.

The last French rider to win this French race was Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle in 1992 and 1993. In 1949, André Mahé & Serse Coppi both shared the win.

4 wins

  • Roger De Vlaeminck (1972, 1974, 1975, 1977)
  • Tom Boonen (2005, 2008, 2009, 2012)

3 wins

  • Octave Lapize (1909, 1910, 1911)
  • Gaston Rebry (1931, 1934, 1935)
  • Rik Van Looy (1961, 1962, 1965)
  • Eddy Merckx (1968, 1970, 1973)
  • Francesco Moser (1978, 1979, 1980)
  • Johan Museeuw (1996, 2000, 2002)
  • Fabian Cancellara (2006, 2010, 2013)

The table below lists all the past Paris-Roubaix winners and their winning times.

YearWinnerWinning time
1896Josef Fischer9hr 17′
1897Maurice Garin9hr 57′ 21″
1898Maurice Garin8hr 13′ 15″
1899Albert Champion8hr 22′ 52″
1900Emile Bouhours7hr 10′ 30″
1901Lucien Lesna10hr 49′ 36″
1902Lucien Lesna9hr 32′
1903Hippolyte Aucouturier9hr 12′ 30″
1904Hippolyte Aucouturier8hr 15′
1905Louis Trousselier8hr 4′ 15″
1906Henri Cornet9hr 59′ 30″
1907Georges Passerieu8hr 45′
1908Cyrille Van Hauwaert10hr 34′ 25″
1909Octave Lapize9hr 3′ 30″
1910Octave Lapize9hr 15′ 12″
1911Octave Lapize8hr 29′ 10″
1912Charles Crupelandt8hr 30′
1913François Faber7hr 30′
1914Charles Crupelandt9hr 2′
1919Henri Pélissier12hr 15′
1920Paul Deman10hr 47′ 20″
1921Henri Pélissier9hr 2′ 30″
1922Albert Dejonghe7hr 47′
1923Heiri Suter8hr 58′ 15″
1924Jules Van Hevel10hr 34′
1925Félix Sellier9hr 16′ 32″
1926Julien Delbecque7hr 34′ 42″
1927Georges Ronsse8hr 32′ 20″
1928André Leducq7hr 44′ 20″
1929Charles Meunier8hr 54′ 50″
1930Julien Vervaecke8hr 11′ 14″
1931Gaston Rebry7hr 1′
1932Romain Gijssels6hr 49′ 58″
1933Sylvère Maes6hr 59′
1934Gaston Rebry7hr 52′ 7″
1935Gaston Rebry6hr 40′ 57″
1936Georges Speicher7hr 15′ 1″
1937Giulio “Jules” Rossi7hr 17′ 57″
1938Lucien Storme8hr 13′ 38″
1939Emile Masson7hr 17′ 30″
1943Marcel Kint6hr 1′ 32″
1944Maurice De Simpelaere6hr 9′ 57″
1945Paul Maye7hr 52′ 54″
1946Georges Claes7hr 13′ 25″
1947Georges Claes6hrn 10′ 34″
1948Rik van Steenbergen5hr 35′ 31″
1949André Mahé & Serse Coppi6hr 11′ 59″
1950Fausto Coppi6hr 18′ 48″
1951Antonio Bevilacqua6hr 7′ 14″
1952Rik van Steenbergen5hr 50′ 31″
1953Germain Derycke5hr 39′ 19″
1954Raymond Impanis6hr 54′ 43″
1955Jean Forestier6hr 6′ 42″
1956Louison Bobet6hr 1′ 26″
1957Fred de Bruyne7hr 15′ 19″
1958Léon van Daele8hr 4′ 41″
1959Noël Foré6hr 8′ 20″
1960Pino Cerami6hr 1′ 45″
1961Rik van Looy6hr 19′ 8″
1962Rik van Looy6hr 43′ 57″
1963Emile Daems7hr 3′ 33″
1964Peter Post5hr 52′ 19″
1965Rik van Looy6hr 23′ 32″
1966Felice Gimondi6hr 59′ 26″
1967Jan Janssen7hr 8′ 31″
1968Eddy Merckx7hr 9′ 26″
1969Walter Godefroot6hr 46′ 47″
1970Eddy Merckx6hr 23′ 15″
1971Roger Rosiers6hr 17′ 53″
1972Roger de Vlaeminck7hr 24′ 5″
1973Eddy Merckx7hr 28′ 43″
1974Roger de Vlaeminck7hr 17′ 26″
1975Roger de Vlaeminck6hr 52′ 4″
1976Marc Demeyer6hr 37′ 41″
1977Roger de Vlaeminck6hr 11′ 26″
1978Francesco Moser7hr 12′ 24″
1979Francesco Moser6hr 17′ 28″
1980Francesco Moser6hr 7′ 28″
1981Bernard Hinault6hr 26′ 7″
1982Jan Raas7hr 21′ 50″
1983Hennie Kuiper6hr 47′ 51″
1984Sean Kelly7hr 31′ 35″
1985Marc Madiot7hr 21′ 10″
1986Sean Kelly6hr 48′ 23″
1987Eric Vanderaerden7hr 18′ 3″
1988Dirk de Mol6hr 34′ 18″
1989Jean-Marie Wampers6hr 46′ 45″
1990Eddy Planckaert7hr 37′ 2″
1991Marc Madiot7hr 8′ 19″
1992Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle6hr 26′ 56″
1993Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle6hr 25′ 20″
1994Andrei Tchmil7hr 28′ 2″
1995Franco Ballerini6hr 27′ 8″
1996Johan Museeuw6hr 5′ 0″
1997Frédéric Guesdon6hr 38′ 10″
1998Franco Ballerini6hr 55′ 16″
1999Andrea Tafi6hr 44′ 15″
2000Johan Museeuw6hr 47′
2001Servais Knaven6hr 45′
2002Johan Museeuw6hr 39′ 8″
2003Peter Van Petegem6hr 11′ 35″
2004Magnus Backstedt6hr 40′ 26″
2005Tom Boonen6hr 29′ 38″
2006Fabian Cancellara6hr 7′ 54″
2007Stuart O’Grady6hr 9′ 7″
2008Tom Boonen5hr 58′ 42″
2009Tom Boonen6hr 15′ 53″
2010Fabian Cancellara6hr 35′ 10″
2011Johan Van Summeren6hr 7′ 28″
2012Tom Boonen5hr 55′ 22″
2013Fabian Cancellara5hr 45′ 33″
2014Niki Terpstra6hr 9′ 1″
2015John Degenkolb5hr 49′ 51″
2016Mathew Hayman5hr 51′ 53″
2017Greg van Avermaet5hr 41′ 7″
2018Peter Sagan5hr 54′ 6″
2019Philippe Gilbert5hr 58′ 2″
2021Sonny Colbrelli6hr 1′ 57″
2022Dylan Van Baarle5hr 37′ 0″

Biggest winning margin of Paris-Roubaix

The biggest winning margin was by Maurice Garin, who won in 1898 with 28 minutes over Auguste Stéphane. This is followed Lucien Lesna (1901, 26 minutes) and Josef Fischer (1896, 25 minutes)

Since 2000, the biggest winning margin was in 2002 when Johan Museeuw won with a 3′ 4″ gap to Steffen Wesemann.

The table below shows the 10 biggest winning margins in Paris-Roubaix.

YearWinnerWinning timeWinning marginSecond place
1898Maurice Garin8hr 13′ 15″28′Auguste Stéphane
1901Lucien Lesna10hr 49′ 36″26′Ambroise Garin
1896Josef Fischer9hr 17′25′Charles Meyer
1899Albert Champion8hr 22′ 52″23′ 21″Paul Bor
1900Emile Bouhours7hr 10′ 30″18′Josef Fischer
1905Louis Trousselier8hr 4′ 15″7′René Pottier
1922Albert Dejonghe7hr 47′6′Jean Rossius
1970Eddy Merckx6hr 23′ 15″5′ 21″Roger de Vlaeminck
1998Franco Ballerini6hr 55′ 16″4′ 16″Andrea Tafi
1966Felice Gimondi6hr 59′ 26″4′ 8″Jan Janssen
2002Johan Museeuw6hr 39′ 8″3′ 4″Steffen Wesemann

Fastest Paris-Roubaix average speed

The fastest Paris-Roubaix was in 2022, won by Dylan van Baarle with an average speed of 45.792km/h (28.45mph).

YearWinnerWinning timeAvg. speed (km/h)
2022Dylan Van Baarle5hr 37′45.792
2017Greg van Avermaet5hr 41′ 7″45.204
1964Peter Post5hr 52′ 19″45.129
2013Fabian Cancellara5hr 45′ 33″44.19
1948Rik van Steenbergen5hr 35′ 31″43.992
2016Mathew Hayman5hr 51′ 53″43.907
2018Peter Sagan5hr 54′ 6″43.547
1960Pino Cerami6hr 1′ 45″43.538
1953Germain Derycke5hr 39′ 19″43.522
2012Tom Boonen5hr 55′ 22″43.476

Slowest Paris-Roubaix average speed

The slowest Paris-Roubaix was in 1924, won by Jules Van Hevel with an average speed of only 25.55km/h (15.88mph).

YearWinnerWinning timeAvg. speed (km/h)
1919Henri Pélissier12hr 15′22.857
1924Jules Van Hevel10hr 34′25.55
1908Cyrille Van Hauwaert10hr 34′ 25″25.63
1901Lucien Lesna10hr 49′ 36″25.862
1920Paul Deman10hr 47′ 20″25.95
1906Henri Cornet9hr 59′ 30″27.034
1925Félix Sellier9hr 16′ 32″28.03
1902Lucien Lesna9hr 32′28.088
1897Maurice Garin9hr 57′ 21″28.124
1921Henri Pélissier9hr 2′ 30″29.09