Milan-San Remo Past Winners and Records

By : Mr Mamil
Updated :

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2022 Milan-San Remo Route Profile
2022 Milan-San Remo Route Profile

The Milan-San Remo is the longest race in professional cycling. It’s widely known as the La Classicissima and is held annually in Italy.

Milan-San Remo is the first among the five Monuments in cycling to take place annually. The other four Monuments are Tour of Flanders, Paris-Roubaix, Liège-Bastogne-Liège, and Giro di Lombardia.

The race was first held in 1907 and won by some of the biggest names in cycling, including Eddy Merckx, Fausto Coppi, and Sean Kelly. More recently, Road World Champions such as Julian Alaphilippe, Michal Kwiatkowski, and Mark Cavendish have won the Milan-San Remo.

Milan-San Remo is notoriously hard to predict because it can go in a number of different ways. In recent years, we have seen everything from solo breakaways to bunch sprints deciding the outcome. This makes for a hugely exciting race that always has the potential to produce a surprise result.

Milan-San Remo route

2022 Milan-San Remo Route Map
2022 Milan-San Remo Route Map

The Milan-San Remo is the longest race on the professional cycling calendar, covering a distance of 298km (185.2mi). The route takes riders from the city of Milan in the north of Italy down to the coastal town of San Remo along the Mediterranean Sea.

The race starts on the Piazza del Duomo in central Milan and heads southwest through the Lombardy and Piedmont plains, passing through the towns of Pavia, Voghera, Tortona, Novi Ligure, and Ovada. The first 100km of the race is usually uneventful.

Once reaching Liguria along the coastline, the peloton will ascend the first climb of the day, Passo del Turchino, at the 140km (87mi) mark. This is followed by a descent onto the Aurelia highway, where the peloton will ride along the flat and scenic Ligurian Coast.

The next decisive point of the race is the Cipressa climb, 5.6km and averaging 4.1%. The top of Cipressa is only 22km (13.7mi) from the finish and is often ridden at a very fast pace.

The Poggio is the last climb of the race (4km at 3.7%) and is often where the winning attack happens. The top of the Poggio is only 4km (2.5mi) from the finish line.

Past Milan-San Remo winners

2022 Milan-San Remo Winner Matej Mohoric
2022 Milan-San Remo Winner Matej Mohoric

Eddy Merckx holds the record with the most Milan-San Remo wins with seven (1966, 1967, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1975, 1976), followed by Costante Girardengo with six (1918, 1921, 1923, 1925, 1926, 1928).

Gino Bartali (1939, 1940, 1947, 1950) and Erik Zabel (1997, 1998, 2000, 2001) each have four wins.

YearWinnerWinning time
1907Lucien Petit-Breton11hr 4′ 15″
1908Cyrille Van Hauwaert11hr 33′
1909Luigi Ganna9hr 32′
1910Eugéne Christophe12hr 24′
1911Gustave Garrigou9hr 37′
1912Henri Pélissier9hr 44′ 30″
1913Odile Defraye9hr 1′ 58″
1914Ugo Agostoni10hr 32′ 32″
1915Ezio Corlaita10hr 36′ 3″
1917Gaetano Belloni12hr 44′ 9″
1918Costante Girardengo11hr 48′
1919Angelo Gremo11hr 26′
1920Gaetano Belloni9hr 27′
1921Costante Girardengo9hr 30′
1922Giovanni Brunero10hr 14′ 31″
1923Costante Girardengo10hr 14′
1924Pietro Linari10hr 50′
1925Costante Girardengo10hr 19′
1926Costante Girardengo9hr 48′
1927Pietro Chesi9hr 43′
1928Costante Girardengo11hr 36′ 30″
1929Alfredo Binda9hr 30′ 30″
1930Michele Mara9hr 43′
1931Alfredo Binda9hr 35′
1932Alfredo Bovet8hr 5′ 45″
1933Learco Guerra7hr 50′ 41″
1934Joseph Demuysère7hr 49′ 30″
1935Giuseppe Olmo7hr 48′ 39″
1936Angelo Varetto7hr 43′
1937Cesare Del Cancia7hr 31′ 30″
1938Giuseppe Olmo7hr 18′ 30″
1939Gino Bartali7hr 31′ 46″
1940Gino Bartali7hr 44′
1941Pierino Favalli7hr 46′ 25″
1942Adolfo Leoni8hr 10′
1943Cino Cinelli8hr 6′
1946Fausto Coppi8hr 9′
1947Gino Bartali8hr 33′
1948Fausto Coppi7hr 33′ 20″
1949Fausto Coppi7hr 22′ 25″
1950Gino Bartali7hr 18′ 52″
1951Louison Bobet7hr 30′ 23″
1952Loretto Petrucci7hr 22′ 7″
1953Loretto Petrucci6hr 59′ 20″
1954Rik van Steenbergen7hr 10′ 3″
1955Germain Derycke7hr 3′ 46″
1956Fred de Bruyne6hr 57′ 10″
1957Miguel Poblet6hr 55′ 51″
1958Rik van Looy6hr 41′ 9″
1959Miguel Poblet6hr 45′ 33″
1960René Privat6hr 45′ 15″
1961Raymond Poulidor7hr 41′ 7″
1962Emile Daems6hr 48′ 6″
1963Joseph Groussard6hr 59′ 38″
1964Tom Simpson6hr 27′ 59″
1965Arie Den Hartog6hr 53′ 32″
1966Eddy Merckx6hr 40′ 40″
1967Eddy Merckx6hr 25′ 40″
1968Rudi Altig6hr 51′ 58″
1969Eddy Merckx6hr 37′ 56″
1970Michele Dancelli6hr 32′ 56″
1971Eddy Merckx7hr 21′ 20″
1972Eddy Merckx6hr 33′ 32″
1973Roger de Vlae’ck6hr 53′ 34″
1974Felice Gimondi6hr 46′ 16″
1975Eddy Merckx7hr 40′ 26″
1976Eddy Merckx6hr 55′ 28″
1977Jan Raas6hr 41′ 59″
1978Roger de Vlae’ck6hr 47′ 35″
1979Roger de Vlae’ck7hr 5′ 44″
1980Pierino Gavazzi6hr 42′ 7″
1981Fons de Wolf6hr 41′ 6″
1982Marc Gomez7hr 4′ 12″
1983Giuseppe Saronni7hr 7′ 59″
1984Francesco Moser7hr 22′ 25″
1985Henni Kuiper7hr 36′ 34″
1986Sean Kelly6hr 57′ 19″
1987Erich Machler7hr 52″
1988Laurent Fignon7hr 6′ 20″
1989Laurent Fignon7hr 8′ 19″
1990Gianni Bugno6hr 25′ 6″
1991Claudio Chiappucci6hr 56′ 36″
1992Sean Kelly7hr 31′ 42″
1993Maurizio Fondriest7hr 25′ 37″
1994Giorgio Furlan7hr 5′ 20″
1995Laurent Jalabert6hr 45′ 20″
1996Gabriele Colombo7hr 27″
1997Erik Zabel6hr 57′ 47″
1998Erik Zabel7hr 10′ 14″
1999Andrei Tchmil6hr 52′ 37″
2000Erik Zabel7hr 11′ 29″
2001Erik Zabel7hr 23′ 13″
2002Mario Cipollini6hr 39′ 30″
2003Paolo Bettini6hr 44′ 43″
2004Oscar Freire7hr 11′ 23″
2005Allesandro Petacchi7hr 11′ 39″
2006Filippo Pozzato6hr 29′ 40″
2007Oscar Freire6hr 43′ 59″
2008Fabian Cancellara7hr 14′ 35″
2009Mark Cavendish6hr 42′ 31″
2010Oscar Freire6hr 57′ 28″
2011Matthew Harley Goss6hr 51′ 10″
2012Simon Gerrans6hr 59′ 24″
2013Gerald Ciolek5hr 37′ 20″
2014Alexander Kristoff6hr 55′ 56″
2015John Degenkolb6hr 46′ 16″
2016Arnaud Demare6hr 54′ 4″
2017Michal Kwiatkowski7hr 8′ 39″
2018Vincenzo Nibali7hr 18′ 43″
2019Julian Alaphilippe6hr 40′ 14″
2020Wout van Aert7hr 16′ 9″
2021Jasper Stuyven6hr 38′ 6″
2022Matej Mohoric6hr 27′ 49″

Biggest winning margin of Milan-San Remo

Giovanni Gerbi won by 40′ 11′ over Giovanni Rossignoli in the first edition in 1905. Since 2000, the biggest winning margin was only 32″ with Thibaut Pinot winning over Vincenzo Nibali.

Since 2000, the biggest winning margin was only 4″ as the finish usually results in a bunch sprint.

The table below shows the 10 biggest winning margins in Giro di Lombardia.

YearWinnerWinning timeWinning marginSecond place
1946Fausto Coppi8hr 9′14′Lucien Teisseire
1917Gaetano Belloni12hr 44′ 9″11′ 48″Costante Girardengo
1927Pietro Chesi9hr 43′9′Alfredo Binda
1929Alfredo Binda9hr 30′ 30″8′ 30″Leonida Frascarelli
1926Costante Girardengo9hr 48′6′ 40″Nello Ciaccheri
1911Gustave Garrigou9hr 37′6′Louis Trousselier
1948Fausto Coppi7hr 33′ 20″5′ 17″Vittorio Rosello
1949Fausto Coppi7hr 22′ 25″4′ 17″Vito Ortelli
1947Gino Bartali8hr 33′3′ 57″Ezio Cecchi
1908Cyrille Van Hauwaert11hr 33′3′ 30″Luigi Ganna

Fastest Milan-San Remo average speed

The fastest Milan-San Remo was in 1990 when Gianni Bugno won with an average speed of 45.806km/h (28.46mph).

YearWinnerWinning timeDistance (km)Avg. speed (km/h)
1990Gianni Bugno6hr 25′ 6″29445.806
2022Matej Mohoric6hr 27′ 49″29345.331
2006Filippo Pozzato6hr 29′ 40″29445.27
2021Jasper Stuyven6hr 38′ 6″29945.064
1967Eddy Merckx6hr 25′ 40″28844.805
2009Mark Cavendish6hr 42′ 31″29844.42
1970Michele Dancelli6hr 32′ 56″28843.98
1972Eddy Merckx6hr 33′ 32″28843.9
2013Gerald Ciolek5hr 37′ 20″24643.754
2007Oscar Freire6hr 43′ 59″29443.665

Slowest Milan-San Remo average speed

The slowest Milan-San Remo was in 1917 when Gaetano Belloni won with an average speed of 22.5km/h (14mph).

YearWinnerWinning timeDistance (km)Avg. speed (km/h)
1917Gaetano Belloni12hr 44′ 9″286.522.5
1910Eugéne Christophe12hr 24′289.323.31
1918Costante Girardengo11hr 48′286.524.28
1908Cyrille Van Hauwaert11hr 33′283.424.54
1928Costante Girardengo11hr 36′ 30″286.524.68
1919Angelo Gremo11hr 26′286.525.06
1907Lucien Petit-Breton11hr 4′ 15″28826.01
1924Pietro Linari10hr 50′286.526.4
1914Ugo Agostoni10hr 32′ 32″286.527.18
1915Ezio Corlaita10hr 36′ 3″28927.26